How long is time

January 7th, 2014

The latest Perpetual Edge Case (a newsletter from the genius brain of R. Stevens) had, as usual, a couple good points.

I like Tumblr and Twitter and all, but you’ll pry my website from my cold, dead pizza cutter prosthesis. No corporate platform is going to keep your stuff up out of nostalgia. Host it yourself or go the way of Geocities.

And I felt bad for my little abandoned blog. And my other abandoned blog. And then I missed RSS. But fuck it, whatever, right? I’ve been posting into the void forever, time to get back at it. Let’s take baby steps.

When we last left our intrepid hero, they were about to go and take pictures for practically 24 hours straight. Sure, it ended up being more like 22, because at 30 you need a little sleep, but hey. There are two Flickr sets, one of the “real” photos and one of assorted bits and snapshots and Instagrams.

9317455949_95e589b1cbOn the roof of the 99W- Drive-In Theatre in Newberg, 1:07am

9316985775_2642f42c1fThe beach at Seaside, 11:16pm

 

It was a great experience and proved that both Chase and I are pretty much made for road projects. Although creatively light overall, 2013 was a good year at reminding me that I do take pictures and not just Instagrams. Though oh man do I take some Instagrams. No shame, though, because documenting with images is how I remember things and that’s how it has been forever.

mosaic79c01c28bbade0839980371c064e7fc5caf2b514What I did (see end for links to individual photos)

 

I got to experience and do and try a lot of stuff in 2013. It can be strange, living with someone with a clear artistic drive and goals, because I tend to just make things to make them. But I might be finding a common thread in all the junk I do and shoot, so that is good.

mosaica49c1362436b33777d53efd5babdfdeaebc1542aWhat I shot (see end for links to individual photos)

Anyway, time keeps on marching, even if I decide to sleep until 1:30p on my first “Saturday” of the new year (well, the first of the year was also on my weekend, but doesn’t count). This year might be good, guys. Let’s keep making shit happen.

 

What I did:
1. For the price of taking Chase to dinner once a month, I can go to the gym every dang day instead (but probs 3x a week).,
2. Prototype.,
3. Finally sorted out the best bits from the dishes of bones someone gave me like, six years ago.,
4. It’s nice to have a healed example next to the grumpy fresh ink.,
5. One more go of bleach and toner and now it’s figured out.,
6. Second literary agent rejection is a very sweet form letter. On to the next!,
7. Chase’s birthday cake. Yes, it took me all evening. Worth it. So worth it.,
8. Smell the Bar Oil, 9. Hydroelectric plant outside Buffalo,
10. Pieces finally coming together on this Maxx costume, now that we have the suit!,
11. Chase DID get me the skull off the bird corpse he found!!! #truluv,
12. Yeah, @chaseallgood uses his new fryer for @ loveforvengeance, @newlton and Mister.

What I shot:
1. Long exposure in yard 01/01/13,
2. Long exposure heat vent 01/19/13,
3. Ladybugs & pepper,
4. Landscapes: 3,
5. Apple cave, gold,
6. Fireworks in Forest Grove,
7. The beach at Seaside, 11:16pm,
8. Hillsboro Air Show: 2013,
9. Washington County Fair: Flower & Garden building,
10. Fields and fields,
11. Stormfront,
12. SAGEBRUSH!!,
13. Bald Peak, 08/14/13,
14. Greens,
15. Persephone

Project Dayshoot: what I’m doing on Monday

July 14th, 2013

I grew up in a small town in South-ish, Central-ish Willamette Valley. Then I moved to another small town and lived there for a long time. While Chase and I lived in Forest Grove I documented the places we went and the drives we took. Part of me always wanted for the WPA to happen again, or to figure out a grant for us to just drive and document.

Now, we get to (or, more properly, Chase gets to and I get to assist and document) be part of Project Dayshoot. July 15th will be the 30th anniversary of “over 90 photographers spen[ding] 24 hours capturing daily life throughout the state of Oregon.” There’s even a book, One Average Day, full of photos taken by photojounalists on a day when I was a couple of months old.

Some fave shots from 'One Average Day' from top left: two club folks at Quality Pie in Portland (Marv Bondarowicz), an aide and a patient at Oregon State Hospital in Pendleton (Robert Pennell), Vera Katz in Salem (Michael Lloyd), an articulated bus and mo

Nobody shot in the town I grew up in (or, more properly, that I grew up just outside), because it was just a little place with a mill. Not that it super matters, those photojournalists did a fabulous job documenting the “people, places and pastimes” of Oregon in the early 80s. It’s a costumer’s dream, because the smaller towns still dress late 1970s on the edges. But here is Project Dayshoot’s statement:

On July 15, 1983, over 90 photographers spent 24 hours capturing daily life throughout the state of Oregon. Project Dayshoot was the name of this venture, and it produced a book entitled One Average Day.

To commemorate the 30th anniversary of Project Dayshoot, the original photographers—plus new contributors—are being organized to capture images throughout Oregon on July 15, 2013. This page, in conjunction with the e-mail address below, is the location for all information related to the project.

Any proceeds from the sale of materials relating to this project will benefit the Oregon Historical Society.

Chase, being a professional photojournalist for the past eight (nearly nine) years, was asked to participate. And, because we already do stuff like this for fun, we have a plan. Other than two scheduled-ish places we’re going to hit, the only goals are the little nowhere towns on the way to and along the coast.

A lot of people, after Chase told Dayshoot where he was going, decided to hit the coast, interestingly enough. It doesn’t matter because we’re not going to stay and make love to the popular places, the biologists, or the noble logger. We’ll be on the move all day (starting at midnight tonight), finding and shooting the things we like to shoot.

And then, when the day is done at midnight on July 15th, we’re on a mini vacation. Not that we’ll stop taking pictures. You can’t break a combined thirty year habit of photographing everything you can.

Fair warning for those following me on social media, I’m cross-linking everything all day tomorrow. So you’ll be able to see what I can upload whenever I get a signal at:

Flickr
Tumblr
Twitter
Instagram

And, if you feel so inclined, document your part of Oregon and hashtag it #dayshoot30. Be part of history and support the Oregon Historical Society! Just remember to note when, what and where you’re shooting.

And to think my intentions were so good

May 23rd, 2013

So, I saw a sweet little moment at the Medieval Faire in Forest Grove.

Magic balloon

And I was like, “I’m gonna paint that all Norman Rockwell stylez.” Because I miss painting. It was fun. I super love using using my Instagram as a documentation of process.

The whole painting process

But everything is the Loc-Nar, for me, so. The feeling sort of changed.

wizard-sm

I do love how this turned out and I decided that since the original is just getting filed away somewhere I might as well make it available to get as a print at Society 6, if you are a creepy fuck who likes to spend money. Or a wonderful person. You could be a wonderful person who likes to spend money too.

Even so, went through it in about a day and a half

April 20th, 2013

Each year, around my birthday, I allow myself one box of cereal. This year it’s wheat Chex, because I live an exciting life.

Even though we break the “no-grain” rule with some regularity, simply not having specific foods (like: cereal, loaves of bread and, as of this year, tortillas) in the house has gone such a long way to prevent too-easy meals and snacks from being relied on. It creates a space where new food habits are built.

A special bonus is that we’ve effectively stripped all my comfort-binging foods from the house. This simultaneously prevents me from indulging and sneakily re-teaches my insides what “full” and “too much” are. So when I give myself the gift of enjoying a box of cereal for my birthday I’m very aware of not only how awesome and deliciously textured it is, but when it’s time to stop refilling the bowl.

Yearly box of cereal is a lesson and a reward.

And, since I’ll have gone through this box rather quickly, nonetheless, I also am very aware why I don’t keep it around. It’s like seeing an ex at a social function. Sure, you get along pretty well and look at how you both avoid Those Topics and yeah, it’d be nice to bang again but outside of that controlled environment you know it would end in tears and torn-out weaves.

So yeah, cereal knows exactly how I like it but can choke its opinions on politics, y’know?

April 3rd, 2013

Even though we’re no-grain there’s a jar of white flour in the cupboard. It’s a vital part of a lot of my crafting, mostly in flour glue for papier mâché. What I forgot that it’s great for, until recently, was salt dough.

Woo, salt dough.

I used to sculpt a lot, with polymer clay. I still have a good bunch of polymer clay, but most of it is old and pretty much useless (the problem with an attic being your studio, there’s a lot of extreme temperatures). So when I got the bug to sculpt some things some months ago, conditioning clay that had a 50% chance of turning into a texture I liked wasn’t really something I wanted to do. So I checked the proportions (1 part salt to 2 parts flour, enough water to make it a “dough”) and made a batch.

Making salt dough.

It’s fabulous stuff to work with, silky but with a good body, sticks to itself with water, the only draw back is how it takes FOREVER to dry, in or out of the oven. From some of the feedback my snaps on Instagram got I gathered that a lot of folks must have played with it growing up.

One of the reasons I got into papier mâché was that it was a media that didn’t cost anything. I needed to make “art” for school, there are copious free weeklies around a campus and I was baking bread so there was always flour (which is stupid cheap in bulk, anyway). I’ve spent maybe 15 years just collecting junk to make things with, the home craft media of papier mâché and salt dough fit perfectly into my world-view of making things out of what you’ve got (sewing is where this breaks down for me, ohhhh fabrics and notions, you dirty temptresses).

I miss sculpture a lot, it’s what I relate most media to, from sewing to painting. Which, I guess that’s obvious in how a lot of my sculpts turn out. I pretty rarely start with a plan, it’s all enjoying the process of making something.

There is a plan.

Anyway, my point is this. I’ve never seen anyone waste their time playing with clay. I’ve seen fabulously ugly beasts formed lovingly, shapes built and destroyed in endless cycles, the surprising genesis of something amazing. But always there’s something, never nothing, even if you junk it all at the end.

If you’ve got a free evening and a bit of flour and salt on hand (ideally at least a quarter cup of flour), give it a try. The worst thing that could happen is you add too much water and end up with soup. But if you only add a little water at a time you’ll be fine. I mean, if you’re doing this in your home, nobody will see the stupid stuff you make. You don’t have to prove skills to anyone, just let yourself play.